What Fitness Pros Eat For Breakfast

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What’s in Season for February: Fermented Foods and Probiotics

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5 Tips to Save Time While Eating Healthy

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Shake that Spice Rack!

Participant warrants represent and agree that he/she is in good physical condition and that he/she has no disability, impairment or ailment preventing him/her from engaging in active or passive exercise. Participant further warrants that he/she has consulted his/her physician and has not been diagnosed with and is not aware of any medical condition that may place the Participant at increased risk of injury or death from engaging in exercise at the level consistent with the intended participation in this Event. I herby give Healthworks Group the absolute right and permission to publish, copyright, and use pictures or videos of me in which I may be included in whole or in part.

15 Tasty Recipes that Will Make You Forget You’re Eating Healthy

It’s a common misconception that healthy eating is bland and boring—that you can’t really eat what you love, or find enjoyment in food. But that’s wrong! If you’re just starting to get your diet in shape, start small with a few healthier substitutes and smaller portions. And have some fun seeking out food and flavors you love incorporated into heathy recipes. Here are a bunch of options to get you started. Bon appétit!

Main Options

Sides & Salads

Healthier Desserts

Find more recipes and regular advice in our nutrition section.

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5 Smart Food Substitutions to Make Healthy Eating Easier

Eating healthier is on a lot of people’s New Year’s resolutions list. And we applaud that! Healthier food options aren’t that hard to come by, but actually choosing the best option comes down to your readiness for change—and not biting off too much at a time. Many people get overwhelmed when they try to completely overhaul their eating. It’s too drastic, which leads to frustration, and eventually your resolution is out the window. 

I recommend taking the advice of Chip and Dan Heath, authors of the book Switch, and “shrink the change.” In other words, when you are trying to eat healthier, don’t set the bar so high right out of the gate. If you don’t like vegetables, don’t cook up Brussels sprouts and expect to discover your new favorite food. Start slow, build up some momentum making better choices, and then try to improve those choices over time.

To show you exactly what this looks like in the real world, I’ve put together a list of five nutritional progressions that you can make slowly, over time, so you don’t feel so overwhelmed and eventually slam dunk that goal! 

A Smart Choice for Bread Lovers

A bagel with cream cheese sure hits the spot, but most people don’t need all those calories when they’re going to be sitting at a desk most of the day. Instead, start out your day by toasting some whole-wheat bread and adding a little peanut butter. You’ll still get your bread fix, only now you’ve added some protein and dramatically cut back on calories. If you’re feeling in the mood, swap out your sugary peanut butter for a natural option. When you’re ready to go all-in, opt for toasted Ezekiel bread with almond butter and a little organic honey. Ezekiel bread contains no sugar, no preservatives, and no artificial ingredients, unlike most other breads.

A Healthier Crunch

When it comes to potato chips, you can never eat just one. Grab a bag to snack on and pretty soon you’re at the bottom. A great swap when you’re just starting to eat healthier is baked chips. Sure, they’re still chips, but you’ll consume fewer calories, which is a nice tradeoff. Ultimately, you’ll want to quit snacking on chips and instead swap them out for a healthy crunch like nuts. Almonds, cashews or pistachios are all good choices. These nuts are loaded with nutrients and contain protein as well as heart-healthy fats.

Find a New Cold Treat

If ice cream is one of your guilty pleasures and you find yourself grabbing for the carton a few too many times, start by substituting it with some flavored yogurt. You can even freeze it, for a more similar texture. You’ll end up consuming fewer calories, less fat, and adding some extra protein. Over time you can work your way up to eating Greek yogurt (which will pack even more of a protein punch) mixed with some fresh fruit.

Get Sneaky with Pasta

A big plate of pasta is a carb-lover’s dream, but when you want to make a healthier choice, start by swapping out your regular pasta for a whole grain option. Once you’ve made the initial change (it wasn’t that bad), now you can start experimenting with squash or zucchini noodles to try and sneak in some vegetables. Also, instead of ground beef in your sauce, go with leaner ground turkey.

Freshen Up Your Salad

Many people try to make a healthier choice by going with salad, but alas, the iceberg lettuce is covered in croutons and smothered in ranch dressing. Start by swapping out your lettuce with spinach to ensure you’re getting more vitamins and minerals. Next, trade those croutons for some grilled chicken and add in a few raw seeds, which will boost your protein intake. Last, ditch the calorie-laden dressing for a homemade option using healthy fat sources like avocado and olive oil.

Nutrition changes can seem very daunting if we try the dramatic approach. Unfortunately, that method rarely works and eventually leads to failure. Start slow and make small, sustainable changes over time and pretty soon healthy eating will become your new normal!

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2 Easy Ways to Boost Your Winter Plate

We all know fruits and veggies are best in-season. They’re usually tastier, and definitely more cost-effective. But when temps drop, it seems like our fresh options are extremely limited—especially in Northern climates. But wait! I suggest you look a little harder. There are in fact several lesser known winter vegetables that deserve their fair share of the spotlight! Turnips and rutabagas, for example, are great go-to winter vegetables chock-full of nutrients, and pretty easy to incorporate into recipes.

Turnips vs. Rutabagas

Both turnips and rutabagas are part of the cruciferous family of vegetables (think cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower). Rutabagas are actually the result of a marriage between a turnip and a cabbage. These cruciferous relatives are round in shape, but vary in size from one another. Turnips are best when about 2-3 inches in size, whereas rutabagas tend to be a bit larger, coming in around 4 inches in diameter. Besides their size, you can distinguish the two by their coloring; turnips are usually off-white with a red or purple band near the stem. Rutabagas are an all-over cream color with a tinge of purple. When selecting these vegetables, go for bulbs that are firm to the touch and are free of blemishes or bruises.

The Case for Both

turnipsIn addition to being cheap and having a long shelf life, turnips and rutabagas are rich in nutrients such as fiber and complex carbohydrates. That means they’re not only filling, but help stabilize blood sugar and energy levels. Turnips and rutabagas also offer quite the hit of vitamin C, which helps grow and repair tissues after that workout we know you did. We’re talking 20 and 30% of your daily requirement of vitamin C per cup for turnips and rutabagas, respectively!

To learn more about the nutrient content of these vegetables, visit the USDA’s nutrient database for turnips and rutabagas. Don’t rush to throw out those turnip stems, either. Those power greens can and should be eaten because they’re full of vitamins like C, A, and K, plus minerals like calcium and iron!

Taste Appeal

Don’t just eat turnips and rutabagas because they’re good for you. I swear they taste good, too! In general, turnips and rutabagas have a slightly sweet, earthy taste. However, the larger the bulb, the more bitter the taste. Turnips also tend to get woody in texture if they’re larger, so stick to the smaller diameter bulbs (it’s not so much of a concern for rutabagas). Because of their neutral taste, turnips and rutabagas are great in place of other white starchy vegetables like potatoes.

Prepping Tips

If you’re lacking culinary creativity, have no fear: You can eat both turnips or rutabaga raw. Simply trim the bottom and top off the vegetables and start peeling. A vegetable peeler will suffice for turnips, but rutabagas are generally covered in a thicker wax layer to help seal in moisture. This layer should be removed before eating. Try a paring knife, rather than a vegetable peeler, to ease the peeling process.

To increase their flavor, try cooking the turnips and rutabagas by cutting them into cubes and roasting them with a bit of oil. Similar to other cruciferous vegetables, the flavor increases with cooking (luckily, the strong sulfuric odor associated with other cruciferous veggies does not)!

If you bought a few more than you can consume immediately, remove the greens from the turnips and store the bulbs in a separate bag to use them within several days. Turnips and rutabagas can be stored several weeks in the fridge, however, or up to months in a vegetable cellar.

Turnip and Rutabaga Recipes

Sources: Turnips and Rutabagas: Rich in Complex Carbohydrates – Berkeley Wellness, The Best Fruits and Vegetables to Eat This Winter – Greatist, Food Composition Database – USDA

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